What Is Binomial Distribution?

A binomial distribution is a discrete probability distribution that shows how many times a given event will occur in a fixed number of trials. The event can either be successful or unsuccessful. The binomial distribution is used to model situations where there are only two possible outcomes for each trial, such as the flip of a coin.

The binomial distribution can be used to calculate the probabilities of various events occurring, such as the probability of getting exactly 3 heads in 10 coin flips, or the probability of correctly answering 6 out of 10 questions on a multiple choice test. The binomial distribution is also useful for calculating expected values, which can be used to make decisions under risk.

To calculate probabilities using the binomial distribution, we need to know the number of trials (n), the probability of success on each trial (p), and the number of successes we are interested in (x). The formula for the binomial distribution is:

P(x) = nCx * p^x * (1-p)^(n-x)

where nCx is the combination function, which gives the number of ways x successes can occur out of n trials.

For example, let’s say we want to calculate the probability of getting exactly 3 heads in 10 coin flips. In this case, n = 10 and x = 3. We also need to know the probability of a head on a single flip, which we will assume is p = 0.5. Plugging these values into the formula, we get:

P(3) = 10C3 * 0.5^3 * (1-0.5)^(10-3)

P(3) = 10 * 0.125 * 1

P(3) = 1.25%

This means that there is a 1.25% chance of getting exactly 3 heads in 10 coin flips.

We can also use the binomial distribution to calculate expected values. The expected value of a binomial distribution is simply the mean, which can be calculated using the following formula:

E(x) = n * p

For example, let’s say we flip a coin 10 times. We can use the binomial distribution to calculate the expected number of heads that we will get. In this case, n = 10 and p = 0.5. Plugging these values into the formula, we get:

E(x) = 10 * 0.5

E(x) = 5

This means that we can expect to get 5 heads if we flip a coin 10 times.

The binomial distribution is a valuable tool for understanding how likely it is for an event to occur, and for making decisions under risk. It is important to note, however, that the binomial distribution only applies to situations where there are two possible outcomes for each trial. If there are more than two possible outcomes, then a different probability distribution must be used.

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